Projects & Responses

Nargis Cyclone relief – Huge needs for the Burma (Humanitarian agencies jointly

To attempt to help the victims of the Asia’s deadliest storms – Nargis Cyclone – in Myanmar or Burma, Humanitarian agencies jointly request $187 million for Myanmar Cyclone relief effort. Read the entire article below:

To attempt to help the victims of the Asia’s deadliest storms – Nargis Cyclone – in Myanmar or Burma, Humanitarian agencies jointly request $187 million for Myanmar Cyclone relief effort.

Humanitarian agencies jointly request $187 million for Myanmar Cyclone relief effort

(New York, 9 May 2008): Relief agencies today issued a joint flash appeal for $187 million to fund an emergency humanitarian effort to help an estimated 1.5 million people in Myanmar who are suffering from the effects of the devastating Cyclone Nargis.

The cyclone ravaged the Ayeyarwady river delta and the former capital, Yangon, leaving more than 22,000 dead, according to an official death toll provided by the Government of Myanmar. Another 41,000 people are still missing. These figures look likely to rise significantly.

A massive humanitarian intervention is urgently needed if a further wave of death from water-borne diseases, malaria, illnesses related to exposure, and hunger is to be avoided.

‘The sheer magnitude of the devastation is such that international assistance is indispensable for ensuring a rapid and coherent response,’ UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator John Holmes said.

The resources appealed for will help international partners – 10 UN organizations and 9 nongovernmental organizations – to support the Government of Myanmar in addressing the needs of those affected for at least three months. The appeal will be regularly updated to reflect needs as the situation evolves.

According to the Humanitarian Country Team, critical needs will be plastic sheeting, water purification materials, water receptacles, cooking sets, mosquito nets, emergency health kits, and food. Fuel shortages have also been reported. The food security situation in the country, which was already severe, is likely to become more acute.

The combined population of the declared disaster areas, Yangon and Ayeyarwady divisions, is around 13 million, with roughly six million living in Yangon and surrounding areas.

‘The sooner humanitarians are allowed in, and the fewer procedural and other obstacles we encounter, the more lives we can help save. The speed with which we deliver assistance to those in need is becoming more and more critical and the danger of the outbreak of epidemics rises by the hour,’ said Mr. Holmes.

‘If we do not act now, and if we do not act fast, more lives will be lost. We are working hard to step up our own response. But we also count on strong support from the international community to alleviate the suffering of millions of people whose lives have been shattered’.

For further information, please call:

Stephanie Bunker,

OCHA-New York: +1 917 367 5126,

mobile: +1 917 892 1679;

John Nyaga,

OCHA-NY: + 1 917 367 9262;

Elisabeth Byrs,

OCHA-Geneva: +41 22 917 2653,

mobile :+41 79 473 4570.

OCHA press releases are available at http://ochaonline.un.org or www.reliefweb.int.

Taken from: www.reliefweb.int.

Nargis Cyclone relief – Huge needs for the Burma (Humanitarian agencies jointly)

To attempt to help the victims of the Asia’s deadliest storms – Nargis Cyclone – in Myanmar or Burma, Humanitarian agencies jointly request $187 million for Myanmar Cyclone relief effort. Read the entire article below:

To attempt to help the victims of the Asia’s deadliest storms – Nargis Cyclone – in Myanmar or Burma, Humanitarian agencies jointly request $187 million for Myanmar Cyclone relief effort.

Humanitarian agencies jointly request $187 million for Myanmar Cyclone relief effort

(New York, 9 May 2008): Relief agencies today issued a joint flash appeal for $187 million to fund an emergency humanitarian effort to help an estimated 1.5 million people in Myanmar who are suffering from the effects of the devastating Cyclone Nargis.

The cyclone ravaged the Ayeyarwady river delta and the former capital, Yangon, leaving more than 22,000 dead, according to an official death toll provided by the Government of Myanmar. Another 41,000 people are still missing. These figures look likely to rise significantly.

A massive humanitarian intervention is urgently needed if a further wave of death from water-borne diseases, malaria, illnesses related to exposure, and hunger is to be avoided.

‘The sheer magnitude of the devastation is such that international assistance is indispensable for ensuring a rapid and coherent response,’ UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator John Holmes said.

The resources appealed for will help international partners – 10 UN organizations and 9 nongovernmental organizations – to support the Government of Myanmar in addressing the needs of those affected for at least three months. The appeal will be regularly updated to reflect needs as the situation evolves.

According to the Humanitarian Country Team, critical needs will be plastic sheeting, water purification materials, water receptacles, cooking sets, mosquito nets, emergency health kits, and food. Fuel shortages have also been reported. The food security situation in the country, which was already severe, is likely to become more acute.

The combined population of the declared disaster areas, Yangon and Ayeyarwady divisions, is around 13 million, with roughly six million living in Yangon and surrounding areas.

‘The sooner humanitarians are allowed in, and the fewer procedural and other obstacles we encounter, the more lives we can help save. The speed with which we deliver assistance to those in need is becoming more and more critical and the danger of the outbreak of epidemics rises by the hour,’ said Mr. Holmes.

‘If we do not act now, and if we do not act fast, more lives will be lost. We are working hard to step up our own response. But we also count on strong support from the international community to alleviate the suffering of millions of people whose lives have been shattered’.

For further information, please call:

Stephanie Bunker, OCHA-New York: +1 917 367 5126     mobile: +1 917 892 1679

John Nyaga, OCHA-NY: + 1 917 367 9262

Elisabeth Byrs, OCHA-Geneva: +41 22 917 2653        mobile: +41 79 473 4570.

OCHA press releases are available at http://ochaonline.un.org  or www.reliefweb.int

Jamalabad Flood Relief Camp which started on 8th August has been closed on 21st

Highlights of the flood relief at Jamalabad, Muzaffarpur, Bihar.

Subject: Jamalabad Flood Relief Camp which started on 8th August has been closed on 21st September after Clothes distribution and Akhanda Kiirtana and Tattva Sabha’

Highlights of the flood relief at Jamalabad, Muzaffarpur, Bihar.

1. 5000 persons out of 10,000 population of Jamalabad Panchayata were fed once a day for ten days
2. 2200 cattle were vaccinated in collaboration with IFAW and Green Power India. Dr. TK Yadav was the chief veterinary doctor. Dr. Yadav has recently returned from UK after a long chequered career of 40 years.
3. Medical service was rendered to the villagers by Dr. Chandreshvara
4. 4000 persons were distributed clothes
5. Nearly 50 persons were initiated in the Panchayata
6. 1000 family were provided with water purifying drugs
7. Akhanda Kiirtan was performed daily and finally the camp closed with Akhanda Kiirtana and tattva sabha

In His service

A’c. Kishan Sood

The second session of Kekeli training got under way last week

The second session of Kekeli training got under way last week. We had 13 women the first day and 15 the second day. The candidates are really smart and good, and they already have a good feeling amongst each other.

Just to keep in touch, here is the latest from Kekeli, the work with women’s health promoters here in Ghana.

The second session of Kekeli training got under way last week. We had 13 women the first day and 15 the second day. The candidates are really smart and good, and they already have a good feeling amongst each other. This is so inspiring to see, how the group of women build up a unity amongst themselves. This is so encouraging for the future, the vision is that Kekeli will grown into a dynamic grassroots movement for health and development, and providing women’s leadership role models. Doris and Olivia from the first batch has come to help out. The training is led by volunteers from the US, Olivia and Jennifer. They are doing well. Olivia is a nurse from San Diego, and Jennifer is a public health graduate from Washington DC.

The candidates come from 9 of the communities that are part of the Northern Zone of the water project, and 6 more communities that lie to the north and North east of the water project area. The training is held at Somekpe village. That is the central location for the Northern Zone.

All the women from the first batch are active except Mawusi from Workpoe who has moved. She has been replaced by another very good candidate who is learning from Dorcas of Agorve and is catching up soon.

The volunteers are adding more teachings about blood pressure and maternal health. They are using a lot of drama and role play, and everyone is having fun. Emperor has been translating so far, as Bernice has been ill, but today I spoke with Bernice, so she is fine now and will be doing the translation for the rest of the training.

We are having plans for meetings of all the women together later (that is all 28 of them!) in the end of October, and other seminars before the end of the year. The other villages in the area are already quarrelling of which are will be the next training, scheduled for April next year. Probably it will be the communities along the road from Kpedzeglo towards Adidome, that is the communities near the road. .

Other volunteers from Canada are scheduled for later in the year and next spring when the next Kekeli session will start. And early next year we have some volunteers from Norway who is going to concentrate on health education through drama. We are busy researching and planning how to structure this work now. Creative ideas are very welcome!

Things in the water project and with the TBA’s (village midwives) are all going well. The homeopathic clinic now has its own room in the clinic, and we are doing clinics and follow up in several villages. The team in the UK is sending a senior homeopath to Ghana almost every month. We are back in contact with Engineers Without Border and hope to build new filters in January. I am off to Burkina Faso next week. We are having and independent evaluation done. And another ten day training session, starting on the 26th of September for ten days. Our funding for Burkina Faso is running out at the end of the year. We will regroup and plan new activities, and if we get some funding, hopefully resume the work, with a slightly different structure or format sometime before the middle of 2008. Much depends on the evaluation.

Other than that an assessment team is going to the flood affected areas in the north of Ghana. We are a bit late, but judging from what we hear in the media, there will be work do to there for some time to come. We are trying to select on neglected community and do something concrete for them. We will start with medical, and if things go well, we will try to assist with the reconstruction too.

Hope to hear form you when you have the chance.

All the best

Dada Daneshananda

First Kekeli (village health promoter) training, Seva village, Ghana, July 2007.

We are working on the health education as best as we can.

Olivia, a volunteer nurse from San Diego came in July. She has been doing well with the work. The two last weeks she had meetings with the Kekeli women, the first week 7 came, and this week 11 came. It seems Mawusi from Workpoe will not be able to continue, she is pregnant and has moved to the village of her husband. And Olivia has been away for weeks at some Catholic training, we are not too sure if she is coming back to Seva. Others are doing well. Juliana from SItorlokope delivered a healthy boy.

The women reported about all their activities, and all are really trying. I will try to compile their report and send you later sometime. Olviia has recorded all the details in the notebook. Last week Olivia gave them all the duties to give lectures to teach the others, and they performed it well. This was followed by a competition, the women divided themselves into two teams, one called New Life Team, and the other Alavanyo (it will be good!) team. The competition was hard fought by the Alavanya team triumphed with 31 points over New Life’s 30 ½ points. At last weeks meeting they requested to get a lantern, that would facilitate them teaching in the evenings, so we obliged and gave them each a kerosene lanterns and new stock of condoms, they are all doing a good job popularizing condoms.

The TBA’s (Traditional Birth Attendants) also came this week, all day Thursday they had meetings and class with Olivia who used the flip charts from the US to explain about the growth of the baby in the womb through the trimesters. They had many questions about miscarriages and other issues, and a new class for the TBA’s is scheduled for next week Friday. They received restock of cord clamps and next week they will get a rubber spread that can be easily cleaned that will be used during the deliveries.

Several of the women want to take initiative for building public toilets in their village. Some of the villages don’t have public toilets at all. We will think what we can do about this and the best way to approach it, but probably in 2008 we will start working on this important work. We just have to make sure to make the right approach. If we make it too easy it won’t be good, the communities will not maintain the cleanliness of the new toilets. So we will set certain conditions for each community to demonstrate their commitment and share the labour and perhaps the cost.

We have started preparing for the training of the second session of Kekeli women, the candidates will come from the Northern Zone of the Zongo Water project. Jennifer is the next volunteer, she is a public health graduate from Washington DC area and we are expecting her on September 9th. The Kekeli training session is scheduled to start on Tuesday the 18th of September.

Olivia has been doing the rounds of the churches talking about AIDS and HIV and has done teachings and checking about Blood Pressure in many communities. A lot of women over 30 has high blood pressure here.

The water project has problem with road construction bulldozers wrecking many pipes between Horkpoe and Agorve, so that three communities have been without water the last two weeks, hopefully within another week or two we will be able to resume service. We called the communities to come to work and dig and most of the digging and re-trenching is finished, I hope it will be completed by next Wednesday. The contractor is supposed to replace the pipes, we are pushing, and also requesting the local DCE (District Chief Executive) to put pressure as the contractor is working for the District.

For the next three days, we will have homeopathic medical camps, today Seva, tomorrow Dadogbe, and Tuesday Tedeafenui. Angie, an experienced homeopath from the UK is visiting and will be working with Emperor. The two villages are areas where we hope to do Kekeli training in 2008, if things well. We will also be checking blood pressure and do health education as the homeopathy is going on.

We are preparing more visual charts and laminate them. The women will use for teaching in the communities.

Just to keep in touch, hope to hear from you when you have the chance. Another volunteer for Seva is leaving on the 9th from Washington DC.

Brotherly yours

Dada Daneshananda